What is a Radiologist?

Radiologists are medical doctors (MD) or doctors who specialise in diagnosing and treating diseases and injuries using medical imaging techniques, such as X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Nuclear Medicine, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Ultrasound.

An x-ray (radiograph) is a special image that uses radiation to create pictures of bones and other internal tissues such as your lungs and bowel. Qscan uses state of the art digital x-ray technology equipment, resulting in a reduced amount of radiation for excellent image quality.

Radiologists in Australia must first become a doctor by completing six years of medicine at an accredited university and gain the degree of MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery). Following this, a doctor wishing to become a radiologist must work in a public hospital for a minimum of two years before being eligible to apply for a radiology training position. Eligibility is decided by an interview(s), references and competence.

Once accepted, the radiology training programme takes five years to complete. During this time, a radiology trainee is known as a radiology registrar, works full time and is often required to be on-call. All study is performed out of hours. In their first year, registrars must pass an examination in medical physics and anatomy. Once successful, registrars continue their basic radiology training, familiarising themselves with common imaging modalities (types of tests/scans) such as plain X-rays, Fluoroscopy, Ultrasound, CT, Nuclear Medicine, Paediatric Radiology, Gynaecological and Obstetric Radiology, Angiography, Interventional Radiology as well as MRI.  In their fourth year, candidates are then eligible to sit a final examination. Success in this examination allows candidates to become Fellows of the College of Radiologists once five years have been completed. Candidates are then entitled to the postscript FRANZCR – Fellow of the Royal Australasian and New Zealand College of Radiologists and may work unsupervised in private practice and/or the public hospital system.

Radiologists have four to six years of unique, specific, post–medical school training that includes radiation safety to ensure the optimal performance of radiological procedures and interpretation of medical images.

What is Subspecialty Radiology?

A radiologist, through extensive clinical work and related research, may also specialise in one or more radiology subspecialties. At Qscan Radiology, our world-class doctor’s specialise in a comprehensive range of subspecialty radiology areas including:

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of diseases of the heart and blood vessels (including the arteries and veins, and the lymphatics). This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound and MRI.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of diseases of the chest, especially the heart and lungs. This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound, MRI and chest procedures, such as lung biopsy and drainage of fluid from the chest.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of diseases of the head and neck. This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound and MRI.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of the muscles and the skeleton. This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound and MRI.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of the brain and nerves, head, neck and spine. This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound and MRI.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of diseases of children. This includes X-rays, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound, MRI and procedures such as fluoroscopy, biopsy and drainage of fluid or abscess collections.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the imaging, diagnosis and treatment of patients utilising minimally invasive interventional techniques. This includes imaging and treatment of the blood vessels (such as angiography, angioplasty and stent placement), biopsy procedures, line and tube placement, uterine fibroid removal, fluid and abscess drainage, These can be performed with X-rays, Fluoroscopy, CT (computed tomography), Ultrasound or MRI.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the imaging, diagnosis and treatment of patients with trace doses of radioactive material. This includes imaging of the heart, the skeletal system, and most organs in the body (for example the thyroid and parathyroid glands, liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, etc.). It also includes the treatment of various conditions in the body such as a hyperactive thyroid gland and thyroid cancer. The imaging modalities include gamma imaging, PET, and PET/CT.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on radiology devoted to the treatment of cancer with radiation. The radiation may be delivered from an outside x-ray source or may be injected into the body.

Qscan subspecialty radiologists focus on the diagnostic imaging and diagnosis of breast diseases and conditions. This includes mammography, breast ultrasound, breast MRI, and breast procedures such as breast biopsy.